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Public Works

Marion Dugald Transportation Improvement Study

The City is conducting a study of Marion Street and Dugald Road to explore different options for transportation improvements that do not include grade separation or widening.

September 2017 Update - A summary of the engagement planning process, as well as the full report, are now available online.


Engage

Thank you to all those who took the time to provide feedback on the previous Marion Grade Separation and Widening Study public engagement process. As we look to begin the public engagement process for the Marion Dugald Transportation Study, we would like to share the results of the conversations we had with you.

A brief overview of what we did:

  • An online survey was launched March 2, 2017 and remained open until March 24, 2017. A total of 404 surveys were submitted to the City in response.
  • Interviews with stakeholders were conducted by telephone from March 13, 2017 to March 31, 2017. A total of 29 telephone interviews were conducted with stakeholders.
  • The study webpage housed on the City of Winnipeg website went live on March 2, 2017 and will remain live throughout the study.

A summary of our engagement planning process, as well as the full report, are now available online.

If you would like to stay updated on City of Winnipeg public engagement events, follow the City on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our newsletter.

Project Timeline

Timeline

Timeline

Background

In 2011, the City of Winnipeg Transportation Master Plan (TMP) recommended that a functional design study be conducted to review the alignment for a widening and grade separation of Marion Street.

On July 18, 2012, Council adopted the Standing Policy Committee on Infrastructure Renewal and Public Works’ recommendation to direct the Public Service to engage a consultant for the purposes of conducting a "Marion Street Widening/Grade Separation and Improvements Functional Design."

In 2013 Council approved funding for and directed the Public Service to conduct a functional design study to investigate the widening and grade separation of Marion Street.

On March 25, 2015, Council adopted the recommendation of the Executive Policy Committee (EPC) to include this project as part of the list of priorities for the Building Canada Fund.

A functional design study was conducted as directed by Council between the spring of 2014 and winter of 2015. The study concluded that of five functional design options presented to the public, Option 2 was the recommended option with a Class 4 Estimate of $566M (City portion is $278M). There was significant and vocal community opposition to this proposed plan due to excessive cost, scale, and intrusiveness of the project in the community.

Due to both affordability and project risk, the Public Service did not recommend moving forward with this option for the Marion Street widening and grade separation project. Rather, the Public Service recommended that an additional study be undertaken to identify alternatives that are more affordable to the City, have less impact on property acquisition, and fit within the existing Council approved debt strategy. Council approved this recommendation, and the Public Service is moving forward with a study of Marion Street and Dugald Road to improve transportation that does not include grade separation or widening.

On November 16, 2016, Council concurred in the Public Service’s recommendation to take the Marion Grade Separation and Widening as information only, and directed the Public Service to investigate lower-cost alternatives to the road alignment that improve traffic operations, safety and enhance pedestrian and cycling accommodation without the inclusion of grade separations or widening along the relevant roads.

Read the report to Council to learn more about the recommendation.

As a result, the City has initiated the new Marion Dugald Transportation Improvement Study to explore different transportation options in the study area. The City recognizes the need to engage citizens meaningfully and took the opportunity to engage the community. The City’s Office of Public Engagement has recently carried out consultations with community members to inform the next stage of the study. A report and summary of the public engagement planning activities are now available online. The input from the engagement planning process informed the development of the public engagement plan for the Marion Dugald Transportation Improvement Study, and the City and consultant will work together to ensure the engagement plan is carried out in accordance with the feedback provided.

To learn more about the engagement process that was undertaken for the Marion Street Widening and Grade Separation study, please read the Public Engagement Executive Summary Report. Your comments on improving this process in the next round of engagement will be critical to ensuring we provide a meaningful engagement process for those interested in the study.

If you would like to stay updated on City of Winnipeg public engagement events, follow the City on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our newsletter.

Frequently Asked Questions

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Why are improvements needed on Marion Street?

The Marion Street area experiences local, commuter, and truck traffic, as well as regular railway use. Delays are common at the Archibald Street intersection, the nearby railway crossing, and Lagimodière Boulevard. Over the next 20 to 30 years, traffic travelling from new and growing communities, both in and around eastern Winnipeg (e.g., West Transcona, Sage Creek), will continue to increase traffic congestion in the area. New and expanding development, including the Public Market Lands, Warman Road Lands, and St. Boniface Industrial Park, will add to local truck traffic and potentially railway use. Other considerations in this growing area include the increasing need for safe and accessible active transportation routes (walking and cycling) and improved transit connections, including accommodation of future Rapid Transit.

Increased residential and industrial development places significant strain on area roads and infrastructure that were not designed to accommodate the high traffic volumes and varying types of traffic experienced in recent years. In 2011, Council approved the Winnipeg Transportation Master Plan, which identifies improvements along the Marion Street-Dugald Road Connection as a short-term major road network improvement.

What lower cost alternatives might be considered?

Current pavement condition of Marion between Lagimodiere Boulevard and Youville Street varies between good, fair and poor. The smaller scale options are likely to include a range of treatments that may include mill & fill and/or rehabilitation and/or reconstruction of existing roadways, enhancing the accommodation of pedestrians and/or adding separate cycling facilities, more modest intersection improvements at the intersection of Marion and Archibald and realignment of Marion to connect with Dugald.

Were any of the other options considered in the first study less expensive? Can’t you use one of those?

All options considered as part of the functional study included widening of Marion Street and grade separation alternatives as per direction from City Council. More affordable, smaller scale options without a grade separation or widening will now be investigated. These options would reduce the land requirements of the project and impact on the surrounding community.

Is a grade separation still an option to alleviate traffic concerns along Marion Street?

Due to both affordability and project risk, the Public Service did not recommend moving forward with the Marion Street widening and grade separation project and City Council concurred. Rather, more affordable, smaller scale options without a grade separation or widening will now be investigated. These options would reduce the land requirements of the project and impact on the surrounding community.

Was public input considered in the study so far?

During the previous Marion Street Widening and Grade Separation Study, a public consultation process was completed which considered five potential options. Public engagement included two open houses, 11 stakeholder meetings, six landowner meetings and two online surveys.

At the end of the Marion Street Widening and Grade Separation Study, we heard that engagement did not meet the expectations of the public.

As a result, the City has initiated the new Marion Dugald Transportation Improvement Study to explore different transportation options in the study area. The City recognizes the need to engage citizens meaningfully and took the opportunity to engage the community. The City's Office of Public Engagement has recently carried out consultations with community members to inform the next stage of the study. A report and summary of the public engagement planning activities are now available online.

Why is the City redoing public engagement when you have already conducted public engagement for the study? Can’t the public’s feedback from the first study be used for this new study?

At the end of the Marion Street Widening and Grade Separation Study, we heard that engagement did not meet the expectations of the public. As well, the project will now be focusing on a different scope of work - more affordable, smaller scale options. Public engagement is an important part of this process to arrive at a solution that fits the community.

Will there be any property acquisitions?

Specific land requirements are not yet known. More affordable, smaller scale options without a grade separation or widening will now be investigated. These options would reduce the land requirements of the project and impact on the surrounding community. The public service is committed to proactively maintaining open lines of communication with any potentially impacted land owners through the process from now until completion.

What will be the impact on Happyland Park?

As we are in the early stages of the studying more affordable, smaller scale options without a grade separation, exact property impacts are not yet known. We anticipate the impact on Happyland Park will be less than what was proposed previously, however this is still yet to be determined.

Why is the City continuing to use WSP (formerly WSP|MMM) as the consultant for this project?

Adding the additional study work to the contract with the current consultant will reduce the time needed to complete the work and will be more efficient as the consultant is already up to speed with the project. The public engagement plan is being developed and delivered in collaboration with the City’s Office of Public Engagement, to ensure that best practices are followed.

What is the total cost of this study?

The cost of the Marion Street Widening and Grade Separation Functional Study was $922,200. A significant amount of design work is already in place and can be used for the Marion Dugald Transportation Improvement Study. The additional study is estimated to cost up to $200,000 and take up to a year to complete.

Last update: September 21, 2017