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Public Works

Roadway Construction

Road Renewal Definitions

There are various types of street renewal, including a reconstruction, rehabilitation, mill & fill, thin bituminous overlay, and improvements within the right-of-way. The length of time a project takes depends on the type of work being done, the size of the project (length, how many lanes, etc.), and any other utility work that needs to be completed.

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Reconstruction

When it's done:

  • All street classifications (regional, collector, local, alleys)
  • Pavement structure is in failed condition (not just the surface or pavement joints)

What's done:

  • Replaces the entire pavement structure:
    • Typically includes renewal of all sidewalks, private approaches and full boulevard restoration
  • Can be either concrete or asphalt (depends on factors including soil conditions and traffic)
  • Accommodates other infrastructure repairs (water or sewer) as applicable
  • Requires the most coordination between works (Water & Waste Department, Manitoba Hydro, other utilities) and construction time
Rehabilitation

When it's done:

  • All street classifications (regional, collector, local, alleys)
  • Pavement structure is in fair to poor condition, with restoration possible with pavement repairs (joints and select slabs) prior to resurfacing
  • Resurfacing restores the ride and improves the drainage, extending the pavement life

What's done:

  • Extensive concrete repairs and new asphalt surface:
    • Only includes renewal of sidewalks in poor condition or requiring improvements for those with restricted mobility
    • Minimizes work on private approaches, overlaying where possible and renewing them where required for grade (drainage)
    • Minimal boulevard restoration, as required by the sidewalk and/or pavement repairs
  • Requires extensive coordination and staging of works, may include other underground infrastructure renewals
Mill & fill

When it's done:

  • Regional streets only
  • Pavement structure is fair to poor, with restoration possible with very minimal pavement repairs prior to resurfacing
  • Resurfacing restores the ride and improves the drainage, extending the pavement life

What's done:

  • Minimal concrete repairs and new asphalt surface:
    • Only includes renewal of sidewalks in poor condition or requiring improvements for those with restricted mobility
    • Minimizes work on private approaches, overlaying where possible and with partial renewals where required for grade
Thin Bituminous Overlay (TBO)

When it's done:

  • Local and collector (non-regional) streets only
  • Bare concrete (no previous overlay) pavement in good to fair condition
  • Resurfacing restores the ride and improves the drainage, to extend the overall pavement life

What's done:

  • Very minor concrete repairs and an overlay to restore drainage and ride:
    • Only safety (e.g. tripping hazards) repairs to sidewalks
    • Minimal private approach work, to permit drainage
  • Requires the least construction time in the field, although coordination between locations is essential
Improvements within the Right-of-Way

When it's done:

  • Can be a stand-alone project, or associated with any of the above types of projects (more typically reconstruction or rehabilitations)
  • Examples:
    • New transportation infrastructure: roads, bridges, sidewalks, paths
    • Addition of pathways, sidewalks, or bike boulevards to an existing roadway
    • Traffic flow improvements – addition of turning lanes, acceleration lanes at an intersection, or realignment of travel lanes
    • New traffic signals
    • Roadway widenings

What's done:

  • The addition is new construction, or removal and replacement with revised alignment
  • Often additional coordination is required with respect to
    • minor property acquisitions or easements
    • relocation of surface infrastructure such as street lights, telecommunications boxes, fire hydrants, etc
    • relocation of pavement infrastructure such as manholes and catchbasin inlets
    • relocation of underground infrastructure such as water and sewer pipes and services, power cables and gas lines
  • These additional requirements can take considerable time (up to two years for property requirements) to resolve prior to beginning construction
Last update: June 6, 2017