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Public Works

Walk Bike Projects

West Alexander Pedestrian and Cycling Corridor

Connecting McPhillips Street to Sherbrook Street

Study, Design, Construction

In September 2015, the City of Winnipeg initiated a public engagement process to receive input on the West Alexander Pedestrian and Cycling Corridor Study. The study created a design for an east-west pedestrian and cycling connection through the West Alexander neighbourhood. Construction is scheduled to take place in 2017.


Project Updates

Starting the week of August 21, 2017 the City of Winnipeg is running a nine-month technical trial of adjustable bike lane curbs on existing bike lanes. The trial will include testing installation methods, monitoring maintenance including snow clearing and spring clean-up, and comfort level of users. The City of Winnipeg is exploring the feasibility of adjustable bike lane curbs. These adjustable bike lane curbs will allow the City to install protected bike lanes, while still being able to adjust the design of the lane if necessary to accommodate feedback from users and other stakeholders, as well as future changes in use of the roadway.

The curbs are currently installed with existing bike lanes at:

  • Sherbrook Street south of Cumberland Avenue
  • Bannatyne Avenue between King Street and Albert Street
We would like to know more about your interaction with these new curbs!

Please fill out this short survey.
We will be collecting feedback from August 21, 2017 to June 1, 2018.

For further information contact pilotproject@winnipeg.ca or contact 311.

Study Area
Map

June 2017

Starting in August 2017 work will begin to resurface McDermot Avenue from Arlington Street to Furby Street, adding a two-way protected bike lane. As part of this work McDermot Avenue will permanently switch to one-way eastbound along this segment. For more information, please see the June construction notice.

Construction notices related to work in the project area will be posted here prior to construction. If you have questions about road renewals or want to receive construction notices via email please contact Brad Cook at Stantec Consulting Ltd. 204-478-8939.

Engage

This project includes a nine-month technical trial of adjustable bike lane curbs on existing bike lanes. To learn more check out the project updates tab.

To tell us what you think about the adjustable curbs pilot project, please fill out this short survey.
We will be collecting feedback from August 21, 2017 to June 1, 2018.

For further information contact pilotproject@winnipeg.ca or contact 311.

In September 2015, the City of Winnipeg initiated a public engagement process to receive input on the West Alexander Pedestrian and Cycling Corridor. To learn what was presented throughout the process please visit the “Documents” tab.

View the recommended design that is scheduled to be constructed in 2017.

If you would like to stay updated on City of Winnipeg public engagement events, follow the City on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for our newsletter.

Public engagement summary

Timeline

Timeline

Background

In November 2011, City of Winnipeg Council approved the Transportation Master Plan (TMP). A key goal of the TMP is to expand the range of travel options that are available to residents, workers, and visitors, as well as to ensure that people are not dependent on one single mode of transportation. The TMP also calls for the development of the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.

In 2015, City Council approved the Winnipeg Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies, which provide a long-range policy framework for active modes of transportation for the next 20 years.

The 2015 Pedestrian and Cycling Action plan was adopted by Council in May 2015, where this study was approved. Feedback received during this process was incorporated into preferred design option, which includes a two-way protected bike lane McDermot Avenue between Arlington Street and Furby Street.

Documents

Document Name Date Type
Community consultations begin for three City pedestrian and cycling projects 2015-09-11 News release
Phase 1 – Newspaper Advertisement 2015-10-05 Advertisement
Phase 1 – Invitation 2015-10-06 Community letters
Phase 1 – Open House Storyboards 2015-10-06 Story Boards
Public invited to open houses to provide input on two City pedestrian and cycling projects 2015-10-08 News release
Phase 1 – Survey Summary 2015-12-15 Report
Phase 1 – Stakeholder Meeting Summary 2016-01-09 Report
Phase 1 – Tire Talk Summary 2016-01-09 Report
Phase 1 – Open House Summary 2016-01-09 Report
Phase 1 – Public Engagement Report 2016-01-09 Report
Phase 2 – Newspaper Advertisement 2016-02-24 Advertisement
Phase 2 – Invitation 2016-03-01 Community letters
Phase 2 – Poster 2016-03-01 Advertisement
Phase 2 – Pop-up Materials 2016-03-01 Pop-up materials
Winnipeggers invited to provide feedback on design options for the Downtown Bike Lane System and West Alexander Pedestrian and Cycling Corridor 2016-03-11 News release
Phase 2 – Public Engagement Report 2016-06-01 Report
Winnipeggers invited to view and provide feedback on preferred designs for two pedestrian and cycling projects 2016-06-10 News release
Phase 3 – Newspaper Advertisement 2016-06-07 Advertisement
Phase 3 – Invitation 2016-06-07 Community letters
Phase 3 – Pop-up storyboards 2016-06-07 Story Boards
Phase 3 – Public Engagement Report 2016-08-01 Report
Recommended design 2016-08-01 Report
June construction notice 2017-06-28 Notice

Frequently Asked Questions

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Will I be able to access area businesses/the hospital during construction?
Access to area businesses and the Health Sciences Centre will be maintained as much as possible throughout the project. Short term private approach closures may be required to facilitate construction and will be reviewed with residents/businesses prior to the construction taking place. Parking will be restricted on McDermot during construction.
Why a pedestrian and cycling corridor through West Alexander?
The City is committed to creating a pedestrian and cycling network that is safe and accessible for people of all ages and abilities. The City’s Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies identify the West Alexander neighbourhood as a high priority. This new protected bike lane is an important connection between current and future cycling infrastructure.
How will this project maintain and enhance safety?
Separating cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles is the safest way to accommodate each mode of transportation. Apart from safe, separated lanes for all users, the project includes enhanced street crossings for pedestrians at select intersections. The City is committed to creating a pedestrian and cycling network that is safe and accessible for people of all ages and abilities.
How much will this project cost?
The McDermot Avenue – Arlington Street to Furby Street project is estimated to cost $1.3 million.
Will there be a loss of on-street parking and loading zone space?
Local businesses and other area stakeholders were directly consulted to ensure that improved cycling infrastructure balances the needs of area businesses and residents. The final design maintains as much on-street parking and loading as possible.
Will vehicular access to private property be limited by new pedestrian and cycling infrastructure?
Vehicular access would not be closed as a result of this project unless requested by the landowner. Where vehicles are required to cross a protected cycling lane for access, signage and surface treatments will promote awareness for both cyclists and vehicles.
Winter lasts about half of the year, so why are we building bike lanes?
The City’s Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies commits to providing and maintaining safe walking and cycling facilities year-round.
Will new cycling lanes connect with existing cycling routes?
Upgraded cycling routes through West Alexander will ensure an enhanced connection across Sherbrook Street to existing painted lanes on McDermot Avenue and Bannatyne Avenue, with options currently being studied to upgrade to protected lanes. Also, this project will connect to future cycling facilities on Arlington Street.
What are the City of Winnipeg’s Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies?
On July 15, 2015, the City of Winnipeg Council adopted the Winnipeg Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies. This document stems from the 2011 Transportation Master Plan. The Strategies provide a long-range policy framework for active modes of transportation in Winnipeg for the next 20 years. Following public engagement in 2013 with more than 3,000 Winnipeggers, the Strategies will assist in the prioritization of walking and cycling infrastructure projects city-wide based on further in-depth engagement with neighbourhood and local stakeholders on a per project basis.
Adjustable bike curb trial
Why is the adjustable bike curb trial being undertaken?
The purpose of the trial is to monitor curb performance through all seasons, monitor users’ comfort levels, assess installation methods, and determine a cost effective durable standard product.
How long will the adjustable bike curb trial continue?
The project will start in August and continue through the winter and spring to determine how the curbs perform in multiple seasons. The City will be monitoring the project and gathering feedback for a period of about nine months.
How can I provide feedback on the adjustable bike lane curbs?
An online survey is available to give feedback on how you feel about the adjustable bike lane curbs. Those wishing to provide feedback can also contact the city via email pilotproject@winnipeg.ca and 311.
Why is the adjustable bike curb trial only being done in two small sections of roadway?
The trial is being undertaken on a limited scale to determine feasibility before possibly making a larger investment and expanding the use of adjustable bike lane curbs.
What is the benefit of an adjustable curb?
Adjustable bike lane curbs are being explored because they will allow the City to implement protected bike lanes with the potential to adjust the design of the lane to accommodate feedback from users and other stakeholders as well as to accommodate changes in land use.
How is an adjustable bike lane curb different from other types of protected bike lanes?
Adjustable methods can be more cost effective and a faster way to create a protected bike lane. Rather than constructing a permanent curb into the road (as with Assiniboine bike lane), the curb is anchored to the road surface using steel pins. This method does not require a complete road renewal to implement as with permanent lanes and can be adjusted more easily.
Will this affect parking or loading zones in the adjustable bike curb trial area?
There is no anticipated impact to parking or loading zones in the trial areas.
What are the costs associated with the trial?
The costs are expected to be about $15,000. There may be additional costs related to maintenance that would also be monitored as part of this trial.
Last update: June 30, 2017