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Public Works

Osborne to Downtown Walk Bike Bridge and Connections

Osborne to Downtown Walk Bike Bridge and Connections

Study, Design

Update May 22, 2018—Public engagement Phase 1 summary available now.

The City of Winnipeg (the City) is committed to building pedestrian and cycling infrastructure for people of all ages and abilities. Through this study, a preliminary design for a new pedestrian and cycling bridge over the Assiniboine River will be developed to connect Osborne Village to Downtown via McFadyen Park on the north side of the river and Fort Rouge Park on the south side of the river. Considerations for this project include pedestrian and cycling connectivity throughout Osborne Village to Osborne Rapid Transit Station, Norwood Bridge, bike lanes on Nassau Street, and the riverwalk, upgrades to both McFadyen Park and Fort Rouge Park, crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), and riverbank stabilization.

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Engage

Next Steps

Throughout summer 2018, the project team will finalize the recommended functional design of cycling connections and preliminary design of the bridge and parks. These designs will be submitted for Council consideration following completion of the designs. A detailed design phase will be required ahead of project construction. Funding for detailed design and construction will be contingent on Council approval. A final public engagement report will be available on this project site in fall 2018.

A public public engagement summary outlining what we heard during Phase 1 and how it was incorporated into the latest designs is now available under the documents tab.

For project inquiries please contact City-Engage@winnipeg.ca or 204-986-4243.

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Phase 2

The second phase of engagement was held from May to June 2018 and included stakeholder interviews and a meeting, an online survey, a park visit and a public workshop. Phase 2 was the final round of public engagement before completing the preliminary design of the bridge and parks and the functional design of the pedestrian and cycling connections. The project team is currently processing what we heard and will incorporate input wherever possible during the design process.

During Phase 2 engagement, we were seeking feedback on:

  • Three bridge design concepts, one of which will be further developed to a full preliminary design level.
  • Proposed park concepts for Fort Rouge and McFadyen Parks.
  • Proposed north-south and east-west pedestrian and cycling connections throughout Osborne Village.

Thank you to the 53 people who joined us for a public workshop on June 5, 2018 and the 680 people who took time to fill out the online survey Feedback shared with the project team is currently being analyzed. Participants in the process will have an opportunity to see how their feedback was considered in a final public engagement report in the fall of 2018.

Phase 1

The first phase of engagement was held from December 2017 to March 2018 and included stakeholder interviews and a meeting, an online survey, community feedback boxes, informative warming huts, a pop-up event and a public workshop.

Read the public engagement summary to learn about how we used your Phase 1 feedback to develop conceptual designs.

If you would like to stay updated on City of Winnipeg public engagement events, follow the City on Facebook and Twitter or sign up for the City of Winnipeg public engagement newsletter.

Updates-Bridge

Using the public feedback received in early 2018, the project team developed three bridge concepts for further public input.

Based on what we heard, the following attributes apply to all three bridge concepts:

  • Each bridge provides a safe and efficient pedestrian and cycling connection. The design is intended for mixed-use between pedestrians and cyclists, sharing the space equally without vehicle traffic. The lack of barriers would allow pedestrians to cross to appreciate the view from each side of the bridge.
  • A 5.0 m bridge width was selected in accordance with engineering guidelines to provide sufficient space for pedestrians and cyclists (including wheelchair users) to share the space. This also allows enough space for snow clearing vehicles. Note, sidewalks along Osborne Street Bridge are 2.5 m wide, while the Esplanade Riel pedestrian bridge has a similar sidewalk clearance to the proposed bridge deck at 5.0 m wide. Each bridge concept has at least one area where the bridge deck widens from 5.0 m to 7.0 m to create one or more overlook areas.
  • The bridge widths and bridge approaches through the parks (and to and from bike paths/the roads beyond the parks) will be designed to reduce potential collisions. Appropriate signage will be installed to advise cyclists to slow down. Bridge surfaces will be designed as best possible to be comfortable and safe for cyclists, all types of pedestrians, in all seasons.
  • A bridge architect is a key member of the design team, tasked with providing elegant, aesthetically pleasing design features for each bridge concept.
  • The bridge will be designed to have gradual vertical slopes and approaches in accordance with standards from the City's Accessibility guidelines. This means that all users (cyclists, pedestrians, people in wheelchairs, people with strollers, etc.) will be able to safely use the new bridge. Accessible ramps will be constructed to provide access for people of all ages and abilities from the bridge down to the Riverwalk on the McFadyen Park side. Accessible ramps will also be constructed to provide access for people of all ages and abilities from the bridge down to a potential/future water dock on the Fort Rouge Park side.
  • The bridge will be designed to accommodate pedestrians, cyclists, snow clearing equipment, and large groups of people (i.e. on Canada Day to watch the fireworks at The Forks). The clearance under the bridge will be designed in accordance with navigable waters requirements for boats and above flood protection levels. This will allow for year-round use of the structure.
  • The bridge railing will be designed to a height and with features safe for pedestrians and cyclists. It will not obscure the view from the bridge.
  • Safety is a key aspect of the bridge concepts. There will not be any areas for someone to hide behind on the bridge and the bridge will not be covered. Adequate lighting will be provided on the bridge and off the bridge through the Parks to improve safety. Careful consideration will be given to provide safe lighting to help make the bridge safe and to make the bridge aesthetically beautiful, but to reduce light pollution. Increased public usage of this space will also increase safety. Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) principles will apply.
  • Consideration will be taken with respect to environmental impact. The bridge options will be developed to not include any in-stream piers (columns) in order to reduce impact on the river habitat, and prevent ice jams in the spring, as well as allow for uninterrupted river flow.
  • Some trees will need to be removed for construction of riverbank stabilization, to allow access to construct the bridge, and to build accessible ramps extending to the Riverwalk. The design team is working to minimize the impact on existing, especially mature trees. New trees will be planted in locations surrounding the new park infrastructure. Similarly, lighting will be designed for safety but there will be an effort to minimize light pollution.
  • The bridge concepts include no in-stream piers (columns), such as in the middle in the river. This is a more aesthetically pleasing design.
  • All three bridge options are conceptually designed on a skewed alignment to the Assiniboine River to connect to each park at the most suitable location and to avoid a shallow underground high voltage Manitoba Hydro line that cannot be moved.

Bridge Option 1: Girder Bridge

Key attributes specific to Bridge Option 1: Girder Bridge
This is a straight bridge which crosses the Assiniboine River at a skew angle.
There are two areas of the bridge that gradually expand to 7.0 m wide overlook points.
This bridge can be made more aesthetically beautiful with lighting and artistic features. This bridge features a unique shallow girder design intended to present a slender modern look to the structure.
This bridge option presents the least cost option, compared to Option 2: Cable-Stayed Bridge, and Option 3: Suspension Bridge.

Bridge Option 2: Cable-Stayed Bridge

Key attributes specific to Bridge Option 2: Cable-Stayed Bridge

Landmark double curved bridge:

  • Could attract visitors (as there are very few curvilinear cable-stayed bridges in North America, and this would be the first Canada).
  • Aesthetically unique as it allows someone on the bridge to see the other side of the bridge while crossing it.
  • The double curved feature may help to provide a better "connection to the parks" feeling.
  • The double curved feature will naturally help to slow down pedestrians and cyclists on the bridge (when compared to a straight bridge).
  • The double curved bridge mimics the meandering rivers and streets along rivers in Winnipeg.
The centre of each of the two bridge curves gradually expands to a 7.0 m wide overlook point.
A long bench is built in to each of the inner curves.
This bridge has two angled towers (near each end/abutment) that the cables connect to.
This option is more expensive than Option 1: Girder Bridge and is comparable in price to Option 3: Suspension Bridge.
The cable stays on each curved side will project shadows on the water resembling rays on sunny days.
The bridge cables allow for the inclusion of artistic lighting above the bridge.

Bridge Option 3: Suspension Bridge

Key attributes specific to Bridge Option 3: Suspension Bridge

Landmark straight bridge:

  • Could attract visitors (as there are no suspension bridges in Winnipeg).
This is a straight bridge which crosses the Assiniboine River at a skew angle.
The centre of the bridge gradually expands to a 7.0 m wide overlook point.
This bridge has two piers at each end from which cables are suspended from.
The piers will be located on the riverbanks and the suspension cables strung between them will resemble two separated spaces now connected and held together by the new structure.
This option is more expensive than Option 1: Girder Bridge and is comparable in price to Option 2: Cable-Stayed Bridge.
The bridge piers and cables allow for the inclusion of artistic lighting above the bridge.

What do you think works well or doesn't work well within each bridge concept? For more information on how to provide feedback visit the engage tab.

At this point in the design process, the project team is collecting public feedback and working to select the preferred bridge option. The overall bridge architecture and engineering designs are being investigated to ensure the bridge can physically be constructed and will look a certain way/give a certain feel.

Design items that are not explored at this level of design (but that will be explored in the future) are:

  • Details of the dock location, size, elevation, and aesthetics.
  • Details of what the riding/walking surface of the bridge will look like.
  • Details of what the signage and wayfinding on the bridge, in the parks, and on the active transportation paths will look like.
  • Details of the active transportation path pavement markings, details, and colours.

Updates-Parks

Using the public feedback received in early 2018, the project team has developed a conceptual design for Fort Rouge and McFadyen Parks to receive further public input. Themes have been suggested, such as naturalized playground components that could represent the larger wild 'river bank' environment in a safe and manageable way, while facilitating imaginative and explorative play. However, specific details of the parks are not explored at this level of design. This means that specific details of the play equipment, plaza / seating areas, splash pads, and vegetation have not yet been determined.

Fort Rouge Park is one of Winnipeg’s first parks, celebrating its 125th year in 2018. The new design respects and works within the historic trail pattern, while recommending upgrades to the ageing playground equipment, and a significant expansion and upgrade to the popular spray pad, which was nearing its full capacity and will now be servicing neighbourhoods on both sides of the river.

McFadyen Park redevelopment is aimed at improving the most popular elements such as the playground and tennis courts, grouping them and bringing them closer to the street for enhanced vibrancy and ease of access. The new bridge connection essentially creates one larger park, so residents from both sides have more options for recreation. Underutilized or ageing facilities like the wading pool are in most cases replaced or reconfigured in a new location within the two parks.

Phase 2 parks concept

Fort Rouge Park

Changes in proposed park updates

What is being removed:

  • Bollards and chain fence along River Avenue.
  • Wood park sign.
  • Some trees along riverbank. Note: the design team is working to minimize tree loss, especially of mature trees, and new trees will be planted.

Proposed additions:

  • Improved park street-front appearance with ornamental fencing and contemporary park signs. Fence will also act as a safety feature, providing a barrier between the park and River Avenue.
  • New 3.5 m wide multi-use path ‘loop‘ over existing path connecting the pedestrian bridge to River Avenue.
  • New bike parking to accommodate bike traffic and make the park a destination point for users of all ages.
  • New accessible path and ramp to provide barrier-free access to dock at river.
  • New river edge dock for fishing, canoe launch, potential water taxi stop in summer and access to river trail in winter.
  • New rip-rap to enhance riverbank stabilization and help mitigate future erosion.
  • Upgraded and expanded spray pad to accommodate new users crossing over the bridge from McFadyen Park.
  • Upgrades to three playgrounds with new structures and naturalized play. Structures could include: swing sets, slides, climbing bars etc. to replace ageing / dated equipment. Natural play components could include items such as: plants, logs, water, sand, mud, climbing boulders, hills and trees.
  • All current light fixtures will remain and lights will be added to the accessible ramp and dock.
  • New tree planting to enhance new park features and to achieve no net loss of trees on site.
  • Relocation of granular pathway to gate chamber.

McFadyen Park

Changes in proposed park updates

What is being removed:

  • Wading pool.
  • Washroom building.
  • Bollards and chain fence along Assiniboine Avenue.
  • Wood park sign.
  • Seating area at stairs.
  • Some trees along riverbank. Note: the design team is working to minimize tree loss, especially of mature trees, and new trees will be planted.

Proposed additions:

  • Improved park street-front appearance with low fencing and new park sign and commemorative monument. The fence will also deter children from running across Assiniboine Avenue.
  • New 3.5 m wide multi-use path connecting the pedestrian bridge to Assiniboine Avenue and the existing bike lane.
  • Street front plaza that provides an active space closer to the street for better surveillance and street presence, acts as a traffic calming mechanism for cyclists and pedestrians moving among the playgrounds and tennis courts, separates bridge access from river access, provides shade trees with planters for ample rooting space, and opportunities to sit and watch the surrounding activities.
  • New expanded playground with seating areas, structures and naturalized play. Structures could be items such as: swing sets, slides, climbing bars etc. Natural play components could include items such as plants, logs, water, sand, climbing boulders, hills and trees.
  • New bike parking to encourage lingering and make the park a destination point for users of all ages.
  • New accessible path and ramp to provide barrier-free access to the Assiniboine Riverwalk.
  • Re-configuration and upgrading of tennis courts to include new surface and fencing.
  • Retain existing stairs and upgrade to meet Accessibility Standards.
  • Lighting will be added to the pathways leading to the pedestrian bridge and the accessible ramp to the riverbank.
  • New tree planting to enhance new park features and to achieve no net loss of trees on site.

What do you think works well or doesn’t work well within the parks concept? For more information on how to provide feedback visit the engage tab.

Updates-AT Connections

Proposed AT routes

Proposed Active Transportation connections

These cycling routes have been developed with direction from The City of Winnipeg’s Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies, analysis of public feedback during the first round of public engagement and technical analysis by WSP and the City of Winnipeg’s Public Works department.

One or more of the following connections will be further developed to a functional design level. Further refinements of the route(s) will be determined at a later date. We are currently seeking feedback on the following routes and road treatment options:

Route A – Nassau Street, Roslyn Road, Bryce Street

Nassau Street – Modify Existing Neighbourhood Greenway

parking Nassau
  • Converts Nassau Street to northbound one-way street for vehicular traffic and two-way for cyclists between Roslyn Road and River Avenue by adding a curb extension at Nassau Street and Roslyn Road.
  • The addition of a curb extension to make Nassau a one-way street for vehicles will remove the high volume of southbound cut-through traffic, improving comfort and safety for cyclists and pedestrians on this existing route.
  • This conversion to a one-way street between Roslyn Road and River Avenue will also allow for the space required to incorporate back-in, angled parking, which would increase the amount of on-street parking.
  • This is a low cost option.
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery.

Roslyn Road west of Osborne Street, Option –1 - Raised Bike Lanes

Raised Bike Lanes
  • Raised bike lanes would provide the highest degree of separation possible between cyclists and vehicular traffic in this space-constrained location.
  • Adding raised bike lanes changes north-side parking to a bike lane but maintains the accessible loading zone in front of Fitness Physiotherapy.
  • This option would be more costly than option 2 (buffered bike lanes).
  • Snow is cleared from bike lane by sidewalk plowing machinery.

Roslyn Road west of Osborne Street, Option 2 - Buffered Bike Lanes

Buffered Bike Lanes
  • Adding buffered bike lanes changes north-side parking to bike lane but maintains the accessible loading zone in front of Fitness Physiotherapy.
  • Bike lane and painted buffer are at the minimum acceptable width (1.8m total -including bike lane and buffer).
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery.
  • This option is less costly than option 1 (raised bike lanes).

Roslyn Road east of Osborne Street and Bryce Street north of River Ave - Neighbourhood Greenway

Neighbourhood Greenway
  • Range of treatments to slow down, divert and calm traffic (for example: speed humps, traffic diverters, curb extensions) to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety.
  • Reduces short cutting traffic.
  • This is a low cost option.
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery, making it easier to maintain.

Route B - River Avenue and Stradbrook Street

River Avenue west of Osborne Street, Option 1- Protected Bike Lane

Protected Bike Lane
  • Travel lanes and parking lane configuration remain the same but are narrowed within acceptable widths to accommodate the bike lane.
  • This route provides direct connectivity to destinations in Osborne Village, the proposed walk bike bridge, and provides a direct east-west route through the neighbourhood.
  • This route allows for this design to be extended to Wellington Ave in the future, which is a direction from the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a bike lane on River Avenue is highly desirable (online survey found 458 people in support of route, 56 not in support).
  • Snow is cleared by sidewalk plowing machinery.

River Avenue west of Osborne Street, Option 2 - Raised Bike Lane

Raised Bike Lane
  • Travel lanes and parking lane configuration remain the same but are narrowed within acceptable widths to accommodate the bike lane.
  • A raised bike lane is more costly than a protected lane but allows for high degree of separation between vehicular traffic and cyclists and wider travel lanes.
  • This route provides direct connectivity to destinations in Osborne Village, the proposed walk bike bridge, and provides a direct east-west route through the neighborhood.
  • This route allows for this design to be extended to Wellington Ave in the future, which is a direction from the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a bike lane on River Avenue is highly desirable (online survey found 458 people in support of route, 56 not in support).
  • Snow is cleared by sidewalk plowing machinery.

River Avenue east of Osborne Street - Protected bike lane

Protected bike lane
  • Bike lane is added to the north side of the street, shifting the layout of the road to maintain north-side parking lane and two one-way lanes of traffic. The southern parking lane is removed.
  • This route provides direct connectivity to destinations in Osborne Village, the proposed active walk bike bridge, and provides a direct route through the neighbourhood.
  • This route allows for this design to be extended to Wellington Ave in the future, which direction from the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a bike lane on River Avenue is highly desirable (online survey found 458 people in support of route, 56 not in support).
  • Snow is cleared by sidewalk plowing machinery.

River Avenue east of Donald Street - Neighbourhood Greenway

Neighbourhood Greenway
  • Range of treatments to slow down or divert vehicular traffic (speed humps, traffic diverters, curb extensions, etc.) Convenient connectivity to destinations, publicly desired route, easy to maintain, calms traffic for pedestrian and cyclist safety, reduces short cutting traffic, low cost.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that River Avenue is highly desirable (online survey found 458 people in support of route, 56 not in support).
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery.

Stradbrook Avenue west of Osborne Street, Option 1 - Protected Bike Lane

Protected Bike Lane
  • Travel lanes and parking lane configuration remain the same but are narrowed to accommodate the bike lane.
  • This route provides direct connectivity to destinations in Osborne Village, the proposed walk bike bridge, Harkness Station and provides a direct east-west route through the neighbourhood.
  • This route allows for this design to be extended to Wellington Ave in the future, which is a direction from the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a bike lane on Stradbrook Avenue is desirable (online survey found 363 people in support of route, 67 not in support). 
  • Snow is cleared by sidewalk plowing machinery.

Stradbrook Avenue west of Osborne Street, Option 2 - Raised Bike Lane

Raised Bike Lane
  • Travel lanes and parking lane configuration remain the same but are narrowed to accommodate the bike lane.
  • Raised bike lane is more costly than a protected lane but allows for high degree of separation between vehicular traffic and cyclists and wider travel lanes.
  • This route provides direct connectivity to destinations in Osborne Village, the proposed walk bike bridge, Harkness Station and provides a direct east-west route through the neighbourhood.
  • This route allows for this design to be extended  to Wellington Ave in the future, which is a direction from the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a bike lane on Stradbrook Avenue is desirable (online survey found 363 people in support of route, 67 not in support). 
  • Snow is cleared by sidewalk plowing machinery.

Stradbrook Avenue east of Osborne Street – Protected Bike Lane

Protected Bike Lane
  • Travel lanes and parking lane configuration remain the same but are narrowed to accommodate the bike lane.
  • Parking changed from north lane to south side.
  • This route provides direct connectivity to destinations in Osborne Village, the proposed walk bike bridge, Harkness Station and provides a direct east-west route through the neighbourhood.
  • This route allows for this design to be extended to Wellington Ave in the future, which is a direction from the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a bike lane on Stradbrook Avenue is desirable (online survey found 363 people in support of route, 67 not in support). 
  • Snow is cleared by sidewalk plowing machinery.

Route C - Wardlaw Avenue - Neighbourhood Greenway

Neighbourhood Greenway
  • Range of treatments to slow down, divert and calm traffic (speed humps, traffic diverters, curb extensions) for pedestrian and bike safety.
  • The existing perpendicular parking (which is highly irregular) east of Osborne Street would be changed to parallel street parking for cyclist safety and to accommodate a new sidewalk on the north side of the street.
  • Reduces short cutting traffic.
  • This is a low cost option.
  • Signalized crossing of Osborne Street already exists.
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery.

Route D - Gertrude Avenue - Neighbourhood Greenway

Neighbourhood Greenway
  • Range of treatments to slow down, divert and calm traffic (speed humps, traffic diverters, curb extensions) for pedestrian and bike safety.
  • Reduces short cutting traffic.
  • Directly connects to Gladstone School and River Osborne Community Centre.
  • New signalized crossing would be required at Osborne Street to provide a safe and legal crossing for cyclists.
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery.

Route E - Scott Street Neighbourhood Greenway

Neighbourhood Greenway
  • Range of treatments to slow down, divert and calm traffic (speed humps, traffic diverters, curb extensions) for pedestrian and bike safety.
  • This route provides connectivity between the bridge and the east and west routes.
  • The first round of public engagement revealed that a neighbourhood greenway on    Scott Street was desirable(online survey found 409 people in support of route, 88 not in support).
  • Reduces short cutting traffic.
  • Snow will continue to be cleared by street snow plowing machinery.

The cycling connections of this project will be study to a functional design level, which will requires another phase of design (preliminary design) and additional opportunities for public feedback.

What do you think works well or doesn't work well with these proposed routes? For more information on how to provide feedback, visit the engage tab.

Timeline

Timeline Phase 2

Timeline Phase 2

Background

The City's Transportation Master Plan (TMP) presents a long-term strategy to guide the planning, development, renewal, and maintenance of Winnipeg’s transportation system. In 2015, City Council approved the Winnipeg Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies (PCS), which provide a long-range policy framework for active modes of transportation for the next 20 years.

The City's Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies note that the Red River, Assiniboine River, and the rail corridors create significant barriers within the walking and cycling networks, creating challenges to those navigating Winnipeg on foot or bicycle.

The Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies identifies the need for a new pedestrian and cycling crossing between McFadyen and Fort Rouge Parks along with priorities for new cycling routes in Osborne Village. The existing Osborne Street and Donald Street bridges do not provide all ages and abilities cycling connections across the Assiniboine River.

A new bridge will provide a direct, safe and convenient connection for walking and cycling downtown across the river to the Osborne Rapid Transit Station and in the future to the Southwest Transitway multi-use path. It would additionally provide a safe and convenient connection between the north and south sides of the Assiniboine River.

This crossing has the potential to be a landmark structure for Winnipeg. Key drivers include economy, functionality, constructability, architecture, and artistry. The City envisions an elegant and aesthetically pleasing, but cost effective structure. Creating connections between the wider transportation network includes a connection to Assiniboine Avenue on the north side of the river and to the Osborne Street Bus Rapid Transit Station, Nassau Street, and the Norwood Bridge on the south side.

The public engagement and design process will seek feedback on current use, values, and opportunities for improvements while also assessing potential for sharing park amenities through the new bridge connection.

Construction of this project is subject to council approval and funding.

Documents

Document Name Date Type
Workshop invitation 2018-01-04 Advertisement
Public workshop news release 2018-01-04 News Release
Coffee shop exchange 2018-01-04 Postcard
Public Engagement Summary 2018-05-22 Report
Workshop Phase 2 invitation 2018-05-22 Postcard
Workshop Phase 2 advertisement 2018-05-22 Advertisement
Phase 2 workshop boards 2018-06-05 Boards

Frequently Asked Questions

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What is the project?
This preliminary design study will investigate options for a pedestrian and cycling bridge that would fill gaps in the network by connecting McFadyen Park on the north side of the Assiniboine River to Fort Rouge Park south of the river as well as looking at future cycling routes in Osborne Village.
What are the benefits of this project?
Connecting the pedestrian and cycle network on Assiniboine Avenue to future cycling routes in Osborne Village will enhance the vibrancy of both Osborne Village and Downtown. Other benefits of this project include increasing pedestrian and cycling connectivity including to the Osborne Rapid Transit Station, Norwood Bridge, bike lanes on Nassau Street and the Assiniboine riverwalk, upgrades to both McFadyen Park and Fort Rouge Park, crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) and riverbank stabilization.
Will there be a loss of on-street parking and loading zone space?
The City will make every effort to maintain as much on-street parking as possible; however, on-street parking and loading could be impacted.
How much is this study going to cost?
The budget for this study is $400,000.
How is this project being funded?
The project is in the planning stages and any funding to move the project forward to construction would be subject to Council approval.
How will this project maintain and enhance safety?
Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) will be a key consideration for this project.
What types of cycling facilities are you looking at adding in Osborne Village and where could they potentially go?
We are discussing the viability of the proposed cycling routes in the Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies and asking people if there are opportunities/routes we should consider. The consultant will develop three conceptual options, one of which will be chosen as the recommended route. This concept will be further developed to a functional level design.
Why does The City take so long to put in cycling infrastructure?
The City is committed to the process of public engagement and to study in advance of construction. We have to balance the needs of many stakeholders and make sure we listen to the concerns of the public. We can then find solutions, where possible, to support the many ways that people use the streets.
Why are we spending money on bike lanes when you can only use them for six months of the year?
A key direction of the Pedestrian Cycling Strategies is to provide year-round opportunities for people to cycle by prioritizing a winter network. Temperature is not as much a deterrent to winter cycling, but facility conditions are. We are designing our facilities with consideration to efficiency for snow removal. There is much evidence to indicate that a properly maintained cycling network will be used year-round.
Will the bridge be accessible?
Universal Design will be incorporated into the Preliminary Design of the bridge as the intent is to provide a structure to serve all ages and abilities.
What will the bridge look like?
Several options will be developed as part of this study and the preferred option will be chosen based on several factors, including but not limited to: economy, functionality, constructability, architecture, and artistry.
When will the bridge be constructed?
Upon completion of the preliminary study in 2018, further funding, which will be subject to Council approval, will be necessary to carry the project into the detailed design and construction stages at a later date.
What is the connection between this project and Rapid Transit?
Providing a connection from the downtown to rapid transit stations promotes trip chaining, where people can cycle for a portion of their trip and ride transit for another portion of the trip.
Why not just improve the cycling and pedestrian infrastructure on the Osborne Street Bridge?

When the Osborne Street Bridge was rehabilitated in 2011 and 2012, the project team looked at improving pedestrian and cyclist facilities at this location and widened the bridge to the maximum extent possible. However, unfortunately, the City was not able to obtain enough property to widen Osborne Street all the way from the south end of the bridge to Roslyn Road. As a result, at this time, the roadway on the Osborne Village side of the bridge is not wide enough to include a bike lane and accommodate peak hour vehicle traffic demands.

Additionally, building a new bridge between the two parks would have benefits such as the opportunity to share park amenities through the new bridge connection as well as a direct, safe and convenient pedestrian and cycling connections from downtown to the Osborne Rapid Transit Station and in the future to the Southwest Transitway multi-use path.

How will the final bridge design be chosen out of the three options?
The final bridge option will be selected using an evaluation tool, which considers costs, aesthetics, public input, and a number of technical criteria. The project team will assign scores for each criteria, which will be weighted to determine the preferred option.
Why is the bridge deck mixed use and 5 m in width?
4.0 m to 5.0 m (preferred) clear width for a pedestrian/cycling bridge can work well for a shared facility and is common in many jurisdictions. The local 5.0 m precedent at Esplanade Riel, which connects to and from Manitoba's largest tourist destination accommodating a lot of mixed traffic, is working well.
Why is the wading pool being removed for McFadyen Park?
The wading pool is nearing the end of its service life. It has been found to be underutilized and difficult for the City to maintain. We have also heard comments from the public during phase 1 that there is a preference to remove the pool and install different park features (such as an improved playground).
How was public feedback used in phase one?

Public feedback from Phase 1 was collected and grouped into categories with questions and statements, which were analyzed by the City and the design team. Each major question and statement group was addressed directly and incorporated into the current design where possible. A complete list of major questions/statements groups and how they were addressed can be found within the Public Engagement report for Phase 1.

The public engagement summary which is available in the documents tab outlines common themes and how they were applied to the design.

Will there be a loss of on-street parking and loading zone space?
The City will make every effort to maintain as much on-street parking as possible; however, on-street parking and loading could be impacted. The functional design of the cycling connections will require further design refinements and consultation with stakeholders, business owners, and the public will be conducted to ensure potential negative impacts are mitigated as much as possible.
What types of cycling facilities are you looking at adding in Osborne Village and where could they potentially go?
We are considering a variety of cycling routes and facilities appropriate to the type of street identified. These routes are based upon direction from The City of Winnipeg’s Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies, technical analysis by WSP and the City of Winnipeg’s Public Works department and based on people's feedback from the first round of public engagement.
When will a cost estimate be available for this Project?
Upon completion of the Preliminary Design Study in Fall of 2018, a preliminary (class 3) cost estimate will be established. A class 3 estimate will form the basis for budget authorization and is made when the design is roughly one third complete and has an accuracy of -20% to + 30%, setting the initial control estimate against which project deliverables will be measured. The consulting team is currently developing several alternatives for each part of the study: bridge structure, cycling network through Osborne Village, and McFadyen and Fort Rouge Parks improvements. At this time, cost comparisons between the bridge options are based on industry experience. Estimates for each project element are currently in development.
Why do you not have a cost estimate at this time?
The approach of the public engagement plan for this project included the public in the development of options. The City reached out for public feedback early on in the study, prior to the development of any design options, in order to optimize the integration of feedback. Options are now being developed and the City is once again looking for public input into refining the options, before they are finalized and cost estimates are provided.
How can I get involved or learn about the project?
Join our email list to be notified about upcoming engagement activities, look at the "Engage" tab on this website, and follow the City of Winnipeg on Facebook and Twitter.
Last update: July 12, 2018