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Public Works
Walk Bike Projects

Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike Project

Study

The City of Winnipeg (the City) is committed to building pedestrian and cycling infrastructure for people of all ages and abilities. The City is currently undertaking the Wolseley to Downtown Corridor Project to identify options to improve travel choices, accessibility and connectivity.

The study area runs east-west through Wolseley Avenue/Westminster Avenue, Balmoral Street, and Granite Way. As part of the study, the project team will seek input from various stakeholders in the project area in the coming months to help determine the specific alignment and other important considerations in the design process.

Go to Public Engagement Projects Listing.

Updates

March 2020 – Next steps for the west segment of the Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike project depend on conducting advanced traffic modeling scenarios throughout the Wolseley neighbourhood with more accurate traffic data. Collecting data for traffic modeling depends on normal traffic behaviours. Data collection was scheduled to begin late March, but as citizens take precautions recommended by Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living, traffic volumes and patterns are not normal and data collection for modeling has been postponed.

We are currently evaluating options for public engagement for all projects. Public engagement in the West Segment will not proceed until traffic modeling and analysis is complete.

February 2020 – Thank you to everyone who has taken time to provide feedback. In Phase 3 (January 6 – February 9, 2020) we asked you to help us refine the project design and identify barriers to the way you currently use the neighbourhood. We heard from a wide range of citizens; receiving over 1,100 online surveys, participating in several neighbourhood and stakeholder discussions and talking to more than 320 people at the in-person open house.

We hear you. You told us some parts of the design for the Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike balance the safety and needs of all road users, and that other parts leave you concerned – particularly one-way streets and their potential to increase traffic and decrease safety along some residential streets.

This spring, we will have an updated project design based on your input, including a plan to conduct additional traffic modeling scenarios throughout the Wolseley neighbourhood. The City will conduct further meetings and provide further communications before completing the project design. Please ensure you have subscribed to the project update list.

January 2020 – Phase 3 has begun. Please review the Recommended Design tab and view the Engage tab to share your input on the recommended designs through an online survey or learn more about an upcoming in-person open house. Results from Phase 2 of the public engagement program are now available as a public engagement summary and public engagement report under the documents tab.

November 2019 – On November 21, 2019, members of the project team were on Westminster Avenue between Chestnut Street to Langside Street in the central segment of the project area to discuss proposed design elements with residents and businesses. Phase 3 of the project will launch early in January 2020 and will focus on sharing the recommended final design. Opportunities for engagement will include an open house and online survey.

September 2019 – The project team is currently refining pedestrian and cycling improvements for the Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike Project. As a result of detailed discussion with civic departments, public feedback, and further technical assessment the proposed movement of bus transit to Home Street was not selected for further investigation within the scope of the current project. A letter to residents is available under the documents tab.

May 2019 – Phase 2 has begun. Share your input on design options and alternatives through an online survey or in-person at a pop-up, guided walk/bike tour or workshop event. See the Engage tab for survey link and in-person event details.

March 2019 – Development of preliminary options is currently underway. The timeline of this project has shifted, with the phase 2 of the public engagement program planned to begin this spring and will ask for your input on design options and alternatives.

January 2019 – Results from Phase 1 of the public engagement program are now available as a public engagement summary and report under the documents tab.

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Recommended Design

Recommended design for the Wolseley to Downtown Project has been developed to offer improved safety, travel choices, accessibility and connectivity from the Omand's Creek pathway, the protected bicycle lane on Assiniboine Avenue and Sherbrook Street, the bike lane on Maryland Street, and the planned neighbourhood greenway on Ruby Street. The study area runs east-west through Wolseley Avenue/Westminster Avenue, Balmoral Street, and Granite Way.

Please review the video tour for an overview of design highlights. Further design details are available below.

If you would like to provide your perspectives on design options and treatments being considered, please visit the Engage tab.

open house boards

WHAT WE HEARD: EAST

We presented three options for the east area during Phase 2 engagement. Winnipeggers supported one-way vehicle traffic and protected bicycle lanes but were concerned about parking loss and conversion from two-way to one-way streets. The recommended modified design focuses on maintaining the most important safety elements while also minimizing areas of concern.

open house boards
Supported elements Application in recommended design
Protected bicycle lanes and more dedicated bicycle infrastructure Continuous protected bicycle lanes in the east segment allow people of all ages and abilities to comfortably cycle through the area.

The design includes uni-directional bicycle lanes on Westminster/Young/Balmoral Street from Langside Street to Granite Way and bi-directional protected bicycle lanes on the south side of Granite Way between Balmoral Street and Osborne Street.

Reduced short-cutting traffic volumes One-way vehicle access restriction for eastbound motor vehicles traveling on Westminster Avenue, Young Street, and Balmoral Street will reduce short-cutting.
Pedestrian safety and crossing improvements Geometric improvements including curb extensions at the intersection of Balmoral Street and Granite Way will reduce crossing distances for pedestrians, provide a protected intersection for people cycling, and enhance sightlines for motorists.
Unsupported elements Application in recommended design
Removal of parking Parking loss was minimized by transitioning the bidirectional protected bicycle lanes on Granite Way into the boulevard at sidewalk grade and by adding parking pockets for on-street parking and loading.
One-way street The number of one-way streets has been reduced to maintain access and circulation to key destinations to accommodate protected bicycle lanes between Langside Street and Granite Way. The design has removed other one-way street conversions proposed in Phase 2.
open house boards

WHAT WE HEARD: CENTRAL

The proposed design in the central segment needed to connect the designs selected for the east and west segments, while also balancing the needs of adjacent property owners, residents and businesses. Feedback received during Phase 1 noted a variety of safety concerns on Westminster Avenue around the Sherbrook Street and Maryland Street intersections.

What we heard Application in recommended design
Right turning conflicts between motor vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists No right turns on red lights at intersections of Westminster Avenue and Maryland Street, and Westminster Street and Sherbrook Street.

One-way access restriction for eastbound motor vehicles on Wolseley Avenue from Maryland Street to Chestnut Street eliminates right turn conflicts at the southwest corner of the intersection in front of Mulvey School.

Improve connections to existing bicycle facilities on Maryland Street and Sherbrook Street Two-stage left turn boxes accommodate transitions from protected bicycle lanes on Westminster Avenue. Contraflow bicycle lane provides connection for eastbound bicyclists connecting to the southbound bicycle facilities on Maryland Street.
Westminster Avenue between Maryland Street and Sherbrook Street is very busy and lacks clear lane definition for motorists and people cycling. Raised protected bike lanes define space for people cycling through grade separation.
Parking in front of Westminster United Church is very important Combination of bike lane and parking bays to reduce the amount of stalls lost. Removal of bus stop to add more on-street parking.
open house boards west option

WHAT WE HEARD: WEST

We presented two options for the west area during Phase 2 engagement. Because participants supported some elements of each option, we developed a hybrid design that incorporates the best elements while mitigating the biggest concerns.

Supported elements Application in proposed design
Protected bicycle lanes and more dedicated bicycle infrastructure Protected bicycle lanes proposed east of Chestnut Street to provide physically separated bicycle facilities through the busiest section of the west segment and to provide a connection to the protected bicycle lanes in the central segment.
Reduced short-cutting traffic, volumes, traffic diversions Complete vehicle access restriction at Wolseley Avenue and Sherburn Street. One-way eastbound access restriction on Wolseley Avenue (between Maryland Street and Chestnut Street), and Westminster Avenue (between Chestnut Street and Canora Street). Access restriction is critical to reduce shortcutting traffic and overall vehicle volumes along this segment. Proposed directional vehicle access restriction at Westminster and Arlington was replaced with one-way vehicle access restriction for eastbound motor vehicles on Westminster from Canora to Chestnut to maintain westbound access but reduce short-cutting traffic.
Speed humps Speed humps have been used throughout the design to slow vehicle travel speed and reduce shortcutting. Speed tables have replaced speed humps on Westminster Avenue and Wolseley Avenue to align with the preferred treatment on collector streets.
Traffic calming Design elements such as speed humps and tables, curb extensions, vehicle access restrictions, and raised crosswalks are included throughout the west segment to create a roadway with a 30km/h design speed.
Parking maintained Minimal parking changes are required for the preferred design west of Chestnut Street. All on-street parking maintained along Westminster Avenue west of Chestnut Street.

Unsupported elements Application in proposed design
Transit re-routing on Home Street The preferred design accommodates the proposed transit routes from the Transit Master Plan and does not require relocating a transit route onto Home Street or any other streets in the neighbourhood.
Protected bicycle lanes and designated cycling infrastructure Protected bicycle lanes and designated cycling infrastructure The preferred design focuses on reducing traffic volumes and speeds to create a bicycle facility that is comfortable for people of all ages and abilities to share the road with vehicles, while maintaining on-street parking.
One-way One-way access restriction on both Wolseley Avenue from Chestnut Street to Maryland Street and Preston Avenue from Arlington Street to Home Street are important to reduce short-cutting traffic. Additionally, the one-way access restriction on Wolseley Avenue improves the safety of children accessing Mulvey School. With limited support the implementation is recommended as a pilot project along with monitoring. Access restriction was relocated from Walnut Street to Chestnut Street due to identified concerns with short-cutting traffic on Dundurn Street.
Removal of parking The protected bike lane is transitioned into the boulevard to accommodate parking pockets and retain as many parking and loading spaces as possible. Additional parking pockets are not feasible due to the Manitoba Hydro utility poles and mature street trees.

Engage

Phase 3

From January 6 – February 9, 2020 a total of 1,112 online surveys were completed. Thank you to the more than 320 people who joined the project team at the open house event on January 29, 2020. We will use what we heard at the event, the results of the online survey, and what we've heard in conversations with stakeholders over Phase 3 to refine the design and mitigate critical impacts.

We started engagement on this project in late 2018 and are now sharing the recommended designs. The designs take into consideration technical requirements and best practices, Phase 1 stakeholder priorities (including safety, bike network connections, and cycling comfort) and feedback on preliminary designs presented during Phase 2. The public engagement summary and report from Phase 2 are now available under the documents tab. Phase 3 closed on February 9, 2020 and provided an opportunity for us to share and explain the recommended designs, highlight where public input has influenced design, provide clarity on rationale and constraints, and hear how implementation might affect you.

Participate Online

Public input is a key component of Walk Bike projects. View recommended designs and fill out the online survey. The survey will remain open until February 9, 2020.

Thank you to the more than 320 people who joined the project team at the open house event on January 29, 2020. We will use what we heard at the event, the results of the online survey, and what we've heard in conversations with key stakeholders over Phase 3 to refine the design and mitigate critical impacts.

Phase 1 - Results

Thank you to everyone who provided feedback during Phase 1. A total of 844 surveys were completed and the project team recorded 613 in-person interactions at project pop-ups between November 23 – 25, 2018.

Results from Phase 1 of the public engagement program are now available as a public engagement summary and report under the documents tab.

The purpose of Phase 1 of public engagement was to help identify options to improve travel choices, accessibility, and connectivity in the study area. Residents and stakeholders were asked to identify values, strengths, issues, and barriers to active transportation within the study area, specifically related to mobility and safety. This input from Phase 1 will directly influence the design process and the development of alternatives.

Engagement in Phase 1 included:

  • Stakeholder outreach discussions
  • Pop-up events
  • Online survey

Phase 1 - Online Survey Results

Phase 1 infographic 1 Phase 1 infographic 2 Phase 1 infographic 3

Phase 2 – Results

Results from Phase 2 of the public engagement program are now available as a public engagement summary and report under the documents tab.

Thank you to everyone who provided feedback during Phase 2. We're happy so many Winnipeggers provided their perspectives on preliminary design options and treatments. Preliminary design options took into consideration Phase 1 stakeholder priorities including safety, bike network connections, and cycling comfort.

Engagement opportunities included:

  • Stakeholder outreach discussions
  • Workshop
  • Pop-up events
  • Guided walk/bike tour
  • Online survey

From May 30 – June 23, 2019 a total of 883 online surveys were completed. Thank you to the 296 people who joined the project team at an in-person event between June 11 and June 13. Participation was spread across a stakeholder meeting (6 participants), public workshop (97 participants), pop-ups at Tall Grass Prairie (45 participants), outside the gates of Balmoral Hall School (64 participants), Mulvey School Field (71 participants), and a guided walk/bike tour (13 participants).

The project team analyzed all feedback received to make design refinements based on both technical components and stakeholder feedback. Results from Phase 2 of the public engagement program are now available as a public engagement reportunder the documents tab.

Subscribe under the updates tab to receive emails at key project milestones.

For inquiries or for those who require alternate formats or interpretation in order to participate, please contact WolseleyDowntown@intergroup.ca or 204-942-0654.

School Travel Planning (STPE)

In Phase 2 of STPE activities, STPE resource team members (staff from Manitoba Public Insurance, Winnipeg Police Service, the City's Transportation Division, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, and the Winnipeg School Division), the principals at the three schools, as well as representatives on each school's STPE working group were given the opportunity to provide input on the feedback and comments the project team received in Phase 1 of the STPE process. In addition, the STPE working group (23 parents of children attending the three STPE schools) were given the opportunity to provide input on the feedback and comments the project team received in Phase 1 of the STPE process.

The STPE input gathered in Phase 2 influenced the project design process and the development of the recommended designs. A summary of the STPE activities from Phase 2 of the public engagement program are now available as a public engagement report under the documents tab.

Timeline

timeline

Timeline

Background

The Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies (PCS) were approved by City Council in 2015 and provide the long-term vision for providing accessible, convenient and safe walking and cycling infrastructure for people of all ages and abilities. The PCS also assist in the prioritization of active transportation infrastructure projects throughout the city. A key direction of the PCS is to develop local bike networks for each neighbourhood that connect to the existing network and to the Downtown.

The Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike Project was identified as an important part of the network in the PCS and when completed will provide connections to the Omand's Creek pathway, the protected bicycle lane on Assiniboine Avenue and Sherbrook Street, the bike lane on Maryland Street, and the planned neighbourhood greenway on Ruby Street.

The City is currently undertaking the Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike Project to identify options to improve travel choices, accessibility and connectivity. The study area runs east-west through Wolseley Avenue/Westminster Avenue, Balmoral Street, and Granite Way. As part of the study, the project team will seek input from various stakeholders in the project area in the coming months to help determine the specific alignment and other important considerations in the design process.

Starting in November of 2018, school travel planning will take place at three schools along the study corridor: Wolseley School, Mulvey School, and Laura School. These three schools will collect data on how their students travel to and from school, including in-classroom hand-up surveys to determine transportation mode share and family take home surveys, undertake events and guided bike rides and walks, and will participate in collaborative design workshops.

A variety of stakeholders will be engaged on a school walkabout to examine the barriers to active transportation in the community, and to discuss potential school transportation goals, barriers, and solutions. Students will also be engaged through participation in several classroom presentations, as well as photovoice workshops that visually document their perspectives along the corridor.

This data and feedback from the schools will be integrated into the overall Wolseley to Downtown Project, and will be closely considered when developing the corridor design.

Additional public engagement sessions will be held to gather input from area residents.

It's anticipated that the preliminary design will be presented to Council for its consideration of the project and budget in summer 2020.

Documents

Document Name Date Type
Phase 1 – Poster 2018-11-09 Poster
Phase 1 – Postcard 2018-11-09 Postcard
Phase 1 – Public Engagement Report 2019-01-28 Report
Phase 1 – Public Engagement Summary 2019-01-28 Report
No Movement of Bus Transit To Home Street 2019-09-03 Letter
Notice to central segment 2019-11-21 Letter
Phase 3 – Open house boards 2020-01-06 Information boards
Phase 3 – Postcard 2020-01-06 Advertisement
Phase 3 – Poster 2020-01-06 Advertisement
Phase 2 – Public Engagement Report 2020-01-06 Report
Phase 2 – Public Engagement Summary 2020-01-06 Report
Phase 2 – Preliminary Design 2020-01-06 From web
East Section 2020-01-06 Map
Central Section 2020-01-06 Map
West Section 2020-01-06 Map
Phase 3 - News release 2020-01-07 News release

Frequently Asked Questions

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Why is the Wolseley to Downtown WalkBike Project being considered?
The Wolseley to Downtown connection was identified as an important part of the network and will provide connections to the Omand's Creek pathway, the protected bike lane on Assiniboine Avenue and Sherbrook Street, the bike lane on Maryland Street, and the planned neighbourhood greenway on Ruby and Banning Streets.
What is the project area, what streets may be impacted?
The study area runs east-west through Wolseley Avenue/Westminster Avenue, Balmoral Street, and Granite Way. The recommended design proposes various adjustments to a number of streets throughout the study area, these streets include: Wolseley Avenue, Westminster Avenue, Portage Avenue, Clifton Street, Dominion Street, Palmerston Avenue, Preston Avenue, Ethelbert Street, Chestnut Street, Walnut Street, Young Street, Balmoral Street, and Granite Way.
Will I be able to drive on the affected streets?
Yes. The recommended design proposes adjustments to a number of streets in the study area, including full access restrictions and one-way street conversions, however vehicles will be permitted to drive on all streets within the study area, but some movements may be prohibited.
What kind of bike infrastructure is being considered as part of this project?
The recommended design proposes a number of bike infrastructure design concepts, these include:
  • Neighbourhood greenway – A safe and comfortable east-west connection to Downtown for people of all ages and abilities facilitated by speed humps, curb extensions, access restrictions, and a number of conversions to one-way streets.
  • Physical separation and routing changes - Installation of a number of one-way protected bike lanes, as well as minimal conversion from two-way to one-way vehicle traffic.
  • Two-way protected bike lanes - Two-way protected bike lines on the south side of Granite Way from Balmoral Street to Osborne Street.
What kind of changes are being proposed to Winnipeg Transit routes in the area?
Routing changes are being proposed to two (2) routes; 10 St. Boniface/Wolseley; and 71 Arlington. Detailed maps showing a comparison between the current and proposed transit routes can be found in the open house boards. The proposed routing changes in Wolseley and West Broadway are in line with concepts proposed by the Winnipeg Transit Master Plan (WTMP). For more information and to provide input on the WTMP go to: winnipeg.ca/transitmasterplan.
Will there be a loss of on-street parking and loading zone space as a result of new cycling infrastructure?
Parking and loading adjustments have been recommended throughout the design. Minimizing parking and loading impacts near businesses and adding new spaces where possible will ensure easy access and address stakeholder needs.
Wolseley Avenue from Raglan Road to Maryland Street is currently a Sunday/holiday bicycle route; could this project remove that designation?
The recommended design does not include any adjustments to the Sunday/holiday bicycle route on Wolseley Avenue from Raglan Road to Maryland Street.
When will the project be built?
It's anticipated that the preliminary design will be presented to Council for its consideration of the project and budget in summer 2020. Construction will not occur before Council approval.
How much will this project cost?
The Wolseley to Downtown Walk Bike Project will provide a design solution that improves travel choices, accessibility, and connectivity. The final cost for construction will be determined once final design is completed.
Winter lasts about half a year. Why are we putting in bike lanes?
The City's Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies commits to providing and maintaining safe walking and cycling facilities year-round.
How will this project maintain and enhance safety?
Separating pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles is the safest way to accommodate each mode of transportation. Key ingredients of the recommend design concepts include:
  • School safety – Improving safety around schools throughout the study area will encourage walking and cycling to school. Adding new parking and loading spaces will balance the needs of those who drive to school with those who want to feel safe walking and cycling.
  • Reduced traffic speed – Traffic calming features will reduce vehicle speeds.
  • Pedestrian safety improvements – New curb extensions and crosswalks, as well as improvements at intersections, will improve pedestrian safety.
  • Reduce short-cutting traffic – Implementing traffic calming measures and restricting vehicle access at key locations will reduce short-cutting while minimizing local traffic impacts. 
  • Preserve boulevard trees and neighbourhood character – Opportunity for landscaping within Parklet areas
  • Placemaking opportunities - Closing strategic streets to reduce short-cutting traffic will result in additional space that can be used to create dynamic public spaces for community members to meet.
  • All ages and abilities cycling facilities – The east-west connection to downtown will provide a comfortable and safe experience for people of all ages and abilities.
  • Minimize parking impacts - Minimizing parking and loading impacts near businesses and adding new spaces where possible will ensure easy access and address stakeholder needs.
What are the City of Winnipeg's Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies?
The Pedestrian and Cycling Strategies (PCS) were approved by City Council in 2015 and provide the long-term vision for providing accessible, convenient and safe walking and cycling facilities for people of all ages and abilities. The PCS also assist in the prioritization of active transportation infrastructure projects throughout the city.

Maps

area map

Study area

Last update: March 26, 2020

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